Pneumococcal Serotypes Associated with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalizations in Adults in Spain, 2016–2020: The CAPA Study

on behalf of the CAPA Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalOriginal Articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Newer higher valency pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have the potential to reduce the adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) burden. We describe the evolution and distribution of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) serotypes in Spain, focusing on serotypes contained in the 20-valent PCV (PCV20). This was a prospective, observational study of chest X-ray (CXR)-confirmed CAP in immunocompetent adults hospitalized in one of four Spanish hospitals between November 2016 and November 2020. Pneumococci were isolated from cultures and detected in urine using BinaxNow® and Pfizer serotype-specific urinary antigen tests UAD1 and UAD2. We included 1948 adults hospitalized with CXR-CAP. The median age was 69.0 years (IQR: 24 years). At least one comorbidity was present in 84.8% (n = 1653) of patients. At admission, 76.1% of patients had complicated pneumonia. Pneumococcus was identified in 34.9% (n = 680) of study participants. The PCV20 vaccine-type CAP occurred in 23.9% (n = 465) of all patients, 68.4% (n = 465) of patients with pneumococcal CAP, and 82.2% (83/101) of patients who had pneumococcus identified by culture. Serotypes 8 (n = 153; 7.9% of all CAP) and 3 (n = 152; 7.8% of all CAP) were the most frequently identified. Pneumococcus is a common cause of hospitalized CAP among Spanish adults and serotypes contained in PCV20 caused the majority of pneumococcal CAP.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number2781
JournalMicroorganisms
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
StateIndexed - Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 by the authors.

Keywords

  • PCV20 serotypes
  • community-acquired pneumonia
  • pneumococcal conjugate vaccines
  • pneumococcal pneumonia

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